Round and Round crocheted pullover or top

Here are posts related to the Round and Round top-down concept:

FRIDAY, JUNE 6, 2014

Round and Round Pullover or Top to crochet

works fine for dolls, too
An enduring quality of knitting basic socks is that the process is blissfully brainless except for a couple of places to think a little bit.  Pulling together my samples, I came across a bunch of sweaters and tops – for myself, for 18” dolls, and for smaller teddy bears – all from the same ‘round and round’ pattern concept that is pretty brainless, except for a couple of places to think a little bit. 

Schaefer Lisa 3, a lightweight yarn
I start with a narrow band of single crochet rib for the neck – skinny for a simple neckband, wider for a collar.  Making the strip long enough to be a pullover and the front will be low enough that it won’t rub my neck.  The sweater is identical front and back.  Mark 4 points for where the increases will be, then continue in a coil until the yoke is as big as desired.  Then joining front and back, adding a few stitches for the underarm and skipping the sleeve stitches, continue in a coil with no more increases for the length of the body.  Going back for each sleeve, rejoin yarn and stitch in a coil for each sleeve.  And that’s really about it.
Persio bulky weight yarn


Of course, there are Measurements That Matter:  bust, sleeve length, upper arm.  The actual numbers vary depending on the measurements I start with.  The initial increase points can just be set up in quarters along the starting long edge, but for a more fitted top, the sleeve sections are smaller than the front/back sections – and there’s arithmetic for that.  I usually mark the underarm point and do a double decrease every 4th round to taper the sleeve.  Decrease 10% at any lower edge if you want it to look trim before finishing off.  

Using sweater yarns and a simple pattern stitch (like the one below), the focus is on the yarn/texture/color.  The results have been consistently satisfactory.



SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2012

Standard Body Measurements

Following a pattern for a crocheted garment can be tricky because gauge is tricky in crochet. You might match the stitch gauge but not the row gauge. You might want the fabric to be looser or more firm than what you are getting by following the pattern. You might very well be using a different yarn than the pattern indicates. There are lots of factors.

So, knowing what kinds of measurements are involved can be really useful. And it turns out that there are size charts out there that include a lot more information than just the bust/chest measurement that we usually depend on when buying ready-made garments. The Craft Yarn Council has pages on their website with this information. Here are some links:


The kinds of information shown on this page and listed in the body charts

or

and there are charts for women and men, too)

give you a clue of what kinds of measurements to look for, for example, with making doll clothes, too.

These charts are handy tools in my information kit.


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